Will you be able to recognise the signs and symptoms of a heart attack? The response is almost certainly yes if you’re a guy. But if you’re a woman, things are a little different. Visit us on Women’s Heart Health Near Me.

It’s not because women aren’t aware of what’s going on. It’s just that the classic heart attack signs of a sharp, crushing pain in the chest or arm aren’t as common in women. Shortness of breath, light-headedness, nausea, and back pain are also possible side effects. Although these symptoms can indicate a heart attack in women, they can also indicate a variety of other minor issues, such as stress, PMS, or the flu. That’s why, when a woman has a heart attack, the symptoms can be deceptively mild, and medical attention is often delayed because heart attacks are still considered a man’s disease. It’s also why women have a lower chance of surviving a heart attack than men.

Heart disease and stroke are the first and third leading causes of death for women, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). These are only two of the many cardiovascular diseases that kill nearly 500,000 women each year. Fortunately, you have a lot of options for changing those numbers. It should come as no surprise that a woman who smokes and uses birth control pills has a higher risk of heart disease or stroke. Hormone replacement therapy, which is used to alleviate the effects of menopause, also raises the risk. However, even without HRT, the risk of heart failure skyrockets after menopause. Obesity can also increase the risk of heart disease. Maintain a healthy weight and cholesterol levels to safeguard your health. With a few exceptions, women and men have similar cholesterol targets: For men, HDL (“good”) cholesterol should be above 40mg/dl, while for women, it should be above 50mg/dl. Triglyceride levels are a risk factor for both men and women, but a high level of these blood fats tends to confer a greater risk to women, so keep yours below 150mg/dl. Even, if you’re a smoker, quit! For unknown reasons, smoking is more detrimental to women than it is to men. However, one thing we do know about smoking is that it lowers HDL cholesterol levels.

Some risk factors are uncontrollable. If your parents or siblings, for example, have a history of high cholesterol and heart disease, you are at an increased risk. In reality, having a father or brother who has or had heart disease before the age of 55, or a mother or sister who has or had heart disease before the age of 65, will increase the risk of having a heart attack significantly. Although you can’t reverse your family background, you can alter your diet and exercise to maintain healthy cholesterol levels, but this isn’t always enough. If that’s the case, there are other options for dealing with the issue.